Autumn Arielle Skirt

arielle skirt

Hello everyone! How have you been? I’m back with a proper project this time! Introducing my first Arielle skirt.Red Wool Arielle

The Arielle skirt is another Tilly pattern. I know, I know, I need to branch out. But her patterns always work, guys! They’re safe and comforting and considering my hygge kick, that’s just what I needed. I bought some lovely wool blend in a deep red/maroon in Masons with this project in mind and for lining I used leftover spotty cotton fabric from my Mimi blouse.

Red Wool Arielle

My hips are always larger than the rest of me on patterns, so I graded out a size from the waist. The waist still turned out too big, requiring me to sew the top button on a little further over to cinch it in. I don’t think this has altered the hang too much, but I may grade in another size at the waist next time.

Red Wool Arielle

Red Wool Arielle

This is a great wardrobe filler pattern. If you make it in a plain colour it will go with loads of things, but the buttons make it much more fun than a plain mini skirt. And look at those buttons! I love it when you find the perfect buttons in your stash to make your project sing. One slight worry is that sometimes they feel like they’re being strained when I sit down – it’s a little scary having the buttons as the only thing holding it together.

Red Wool Arielle

As for construction, this all went together very easily. The only challenge I had was the curved corner on the lining, but an iron soon tamed it. I didn’t fold the hem up as much as the pattern because it was already a good length when I tried it on hem-less. I did the hem by hand as well, so that the stitching wouldn’t be visible on the outside, and I’m glad I made the effort because it looks really good

Red Wool ArielleAll in all I’m really pleased with this. It will work really well with jumpers and cardies and tights, but it will also look good in the spring with a blouse tucked in. I just hope I’ve sewn those buttons on well enough because buttons falling off could be a little disastrous…

How Awesome is Autumn?

Cream Emperor Progress

My goodness, it has been a while since I posted something on here. My sewing machine went to sewing machine hospital for his buttonholer and I moved onto some other projects for a while, though I have a couple of projects under my belt to tell you about. All in good time!

Today I want to talk about autumn. I think autumn might be my favourite season. I love the cold, crisp mornings, the crunchy leaves, the golden colours, the warm cosy clothes, the fireworks, baked potatoes and warm nights in front of the fire with your family and friends. A few weeks ago I discovered the Danish word “hygge” (HOO-gah), which really encapsulates what I love about autumn – a feeling of cosiness, creating a warm atmosphere and spending quality time with loved ones.

In the autumn I definitely like to bring this feeling to my wardrobe, with jumpers and scarves and layers and soft, cosy fabrics. One of my projects this autumn has been to knit a scarf. I haven’t mentioned knitting on this blog before because, frankly, I haven’t done any since I started it in March. My crafting is so seasonal and I never fancy knitting until the feeling of hygge takes over me. I also seem to be incredibly slow at it, hardly ever finishing a project larger than a mitten. A few years ago I started a coat, which is still a work in progress, but I thought a scarf might be more likely to get done in front of the tv every night without requiring too much effort. Anyway, this is not a success story yet, it’s taking me forever as always, but I thought I’d give you a sneaky peak 😉 I’m determined to finish this project!

 

Cream Emperor Progress

The pattern is the Red Emperor on Ravelry, which is both free and gorgeous! I decided to make it in cream wool because I always buy scarves in bright colours and find it hard to match them with my clothes, so I wanted something a bit more neutral. The wool is lovely Drops Big Merino, which is incredibly cheap compared to other brands, for some reason, and also seems to often be on sale at Wool Warehouse. The wool is Aran weight rather than the recommended fingering weight, but I don’t think it matters too much with a scarf, so I’m following the pattern to the letter anyway. I like scarves to be wide and shawl-like, so any increase in width from changing the yarn weight can only be in my favour.

I’ll leave you there for now, but just to give you a taster, there is an Arielle and a refashion in the works!

 

Red Roses Akita Blouse

akita blouse

I finally cracked and set up a subscription to Seamwork. There are few things more likely to make me get my wallet out than the phrase “secret pyjamas”, which was used to describe the latest trouser offering in this month’s edition, so I’m now a fully paid up member. If anyone hasn’t heard of it, it’s an online magazine by the fabulous Colette team. The articles are free and well worth a read and for $6 a month you also get 2 patterns with every edition – as a Brit it took me a while to work out that this was actually pretty amazing value. You can also buy the old patterns for $7 each if you don’t want to sign up!

Red Roses Akita

Apart from the aforementioned secret pyjamas (Moji), the lovely Akita blouse pattern is included in this month’s issue. It’s an extremely simple blouse with one pattern piece. You cut the material on the fold and end up with one piece of material and you basically just sew up bust darts, side seams and finish all the edges.

Red Roses Akita

According to Seamwork the pattern is supposed to take one hour. Obviously this doesn’t take into account printing and sticking the pattern pieces (which always takes me FOREVER), cutting out the fabric and making your own bias binding, which I ended up doing. However, it is extremely quick once you have all those things, so it’s a great pattern for a quick fix and now that I’ve got the pattern pieces I can imagine whipping up quite a few of these!

Red Roses Akita

Red Roses Akita

I absolutely love the silhouette of the blouse tucked into a skirt, especially with this drapey fabric. I bought the fabric in Masons and I believe it was labelled as viscose. It has a nice feel to it, similar to peach skin. One downside, which you can see in some of the pictures is that it does crease quite easily, but I don’t mind that much. Partly my fault for taking photos after wearing it to work all day and not ironing it when I got home 😉 I also really like the pattern, which reminds me of Charles Rennie Mackintosh stained glass.

Red Roses Akita

In the instructions you finish the sleeve hem and the slits at the bottom of the side seams before sewing the side seams. I personally think that this has made the join between hem and seam quite weak and I think next time I’ll do it the other way around.

Red Roses Akita

Red Roses Akita

The main problem I had with this pattern, which you can probably see in these photos (again, sorry about the creases…) is that it’s far too long on me. I guess I should have thought about this, but I’ve got used to using Tilly patterns where I don’t have to worry about it so much. It’s not helped by the fact that I did a bad job of cutting the back hem, so it’s a little shorter than the front either. I’m considering shortening the front by a couple of inches so that it looks a bit more balanced, but I think I’ll mostly wear this blouse tucked in, so it’s not a big deal. Next time I cut it out I’ll definitely shorten a bit though. I think I could even do with shortening the top half because the bust darts are quite low.

Red Roses Akita

This was the first time I ventured further than the yard behind our flat for some blog photos and I was really self-conscious about it! I don’t even know why, it just feels weird to be doing a photo shoot and for people to be walking past and watching. I guess this is something I can work on. Do you have blog photo fear too?! Special thanks go to Ben for getting such fab pictures despite an unruly model and fading light :)

Red Roses Akita

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